Next BPC talk for GPs: focus on surgeon results – why we should publish and how to get it right

Mr Alan Doherty
“By publishing my own results, I am placing the information in the patient’s own hands and from my own point of view, I am able to tell patients exactly what to expect because I have extensive data to show exactly how my patients have got on after surgery.”
Mr Alan Doherty, Consultant Urologist, Birmingham Prostate Clinic

The next in a series of regular talks to GPs will be on the theme of surgeon results – why they are important and how to get them right.

The event will take place at the Birmingham Medical Institute in Harborne on November 20, organised by BMI Priory Hospital, which is attended by GPs working throughout the West Midlands.

BPC consultant urologist Alan Doherty will be running two sessions; the first on the ‘hot topic’ of surgeon outcomes.

There has recently been extensive media coverage and controversy around the first publication of surgeon results.

The individual results of 3,500 surgeons, covering 20 different procedures, were published by the NHS in July. The Royal College of Surgeons described the step as a “watershed moment” for surgery.

However, some surgeons refused to provide data and there was criticism that data did not accurately take into account differences in the patient cohorts of each surgeon.

Mr Doherty, who publishes his results in an accessible online results centre is a leading supporter of making outcomes available to patients and wholly transparent.

His talk will focus on why individual results should be published and how to do so.

“At the moment, a man who needs to have prostate cancer surgery, will probably not be told how many of these operations his surgeon has done.

“When talking about likely complications, such as incontinence and erectile dysfunction, the patient will probably be given statistics from national studies (which are highly variable), rather than the surgeon’s own.

“This is neither fair nor helpful. By publishing my own results, I am placing the information in the patient’s own hands and from my own point of view, I am able to tell patients exactly what to expect because I have extensive data to show exactly how my patients have got on after surgery.”